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Title: Ferromagnetic Resonance in Permalloy Metasurfaces
Permalloy films with one-dimensional profile modulation of submicron periodicity are fabricated based on commercially available DVD-R discs and studied using ferromagnetic resonance method and micromagnetic numerical simulations. The main resonance position shows in-plane angular dependence which is strongly reminiscent of that in ferromagnetic films with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. The main signal and additional low-field lines are attributed to multiple standing spin-wave resonances defined by the grating period. The results may present interest in magnetic metamaterials and magnonics applications.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1830886
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10273691
Journal Name:
Applied Magnetic Resonance
ISSN:
0937-9347
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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