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Title: Energy and Emission Prediction for Mixed-Vehicle Transit Fleets Using Multi-Task and Inductive Transfer Learning,
Public transit agencies are focused on making their fixed-line bus systems more energy efficient by introducing electric (EV) and hybrid (HV) vehicles to their eets. However, because of the high upfront cost of these vehicles, most agencies are tasked with managing a mixed-fleet of internal combustion vehicles (ICEVs), EVs, and HVs. In managing mixed-fleets, agencies require accurate predictions of energy use for optimizing the assignment of vehicles to transit routes, scheduling charging, and ensuring that emission standards are met. The current state-of-the-art is to develop separate neural network models to predict energy consumption for each vehicle class. Although different vehicle classes’ energy consumption depends on a varied set of covariates, we hypothesize that there are broader generalizable patterns that govern energy consumption and emissions. In this paper, we seek to extract these patterns to aid learning to address two problems faced by transit agencies. First, in the case of a transit agency which operates many ICEVs, HVs, and EVs, we use multi-task learning (MTL) to improve accuracy of forecasting energy consumption. Second, in the case where there is a significant variation in vehicles in each category, we use inductive transfer learning (ITL) to improve predictive accuracy for vehicle class models more » with insufficient data. As this work is to be deployed by our partner agency, we also provide an online pipeline for joining the various sensor streams for xed-line transit energy prediction. We find that our approach outperforms vehicle-specific baselines in both the MTL and ITL settings. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1952011
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10275747
Journal Name:
Joint European Conference on Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery in Databases, 2021.
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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