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Title: Effect of Thickness of a Dye-doped Polymeric Film on the Concentration Quenching of Luminescence
We have studied the dependence of concentration quenching of luminescence on the thickness d of dye-doped polymeric films (HITC:PMMA) and found a strong inhibition of the donor-acceptor energy transfer (concentration quenching) at small values of d.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1856515
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10276489
Journal Name:
CLEO Conference (virtual), May 9 – May 14, 2021, paper JW1A.96.
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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