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Title: A review of soft wearable robots that provide active assistance: Trends, common actuation methods, fabrication, and applications
Abstract This review meta-analysis combines and compares the findings of previously published works in the field of soft wearable robots (SWRs) that provide active methods of actuation for assistive and augmentative purposes. A thorough investigation of major contributions in the field of an SWR is made to analyze trends in the field focused on fluidic and cable-driven systems, prevalent and successful approaches, and identify the future direction of SWRs and active actuation strategies. Types of soft actuators used in wearables are outlined, as well as general practices for fabrication methods of soft actuators and considerations for human–robot interface designs of garment-like exosuits. An overview of well-known and emerging upper body (UB)- and lower body (LB)-assistive technologies is categorized by the specific joints and degree of freedom (DoF) assisted and which actuator methodology is provided. Different use cases for SWRs are addressed, as well as implementation strategies and design applications.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
2025797
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10276573
Journal Name:
Wearable Technologies
Volume:
1
ISSN:
2631-7176
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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