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Title: Integrating Parsons Puzzles with Scratch
We surveyed grade 6-9 teachers to learn teacher perceptions of student engagement with computational thinking (CT) and how well their needs are met by existing CT learning systems. The results and a literature review lead us to extend the trend of balancing Scratch’s agency with structure to better serve learners and reduce burden on teachers aiming to learn and teach CT. In this paper, we integrate Parsons Programming Puzzles (PPPs) with Scratch and analyze the effects on adults, who crucially influence the education of their children. The results from our small pilot study suggest PPPs catalyze CT motivation, reduce extraneous cognitive load, and increase learning efficiency without jeopardizing performance on transfer tasks.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1815494 1563555
NSF-PAR ID:
10281318
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
29th International Conference on Computers in Education (ICCE)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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