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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2022

Title: General theory and observation of Cherenkov radiation induced by multimode solitons
Abstract Advancements in computational capabilities along with the possibility of accessing high power levels have stimulated a reconsideration of multimode fibers. Multimode fibers are nowadays intensely pursued in terms of addressing longstanding issues related to information bandwidth and implementing new classes of high-power laser sources. In addition, the multifaceted nature of this platform, arising from the complexity associated with hundreds and thousands of interacting modes, has provided a fertile ground for observing novel physical effects. However, this same complexity has introduced a formidable challenge in understanding these newly emerging physical phenomena. Here, we provide a comprehensive theory capable of explaining the distinct Cherenkov radiation lines produced during multimode soliton fission events taking place in nonlinear multimode optical fibers. Our analysis reveals that this broadband dispersive wave emission is a direct byproduct of the nonlinear merging of the constituent modes comprising the resulting multimode soliton entities, and is possible in both the normal and anomalous dispersive regions. These theoretical predictions are experimentally and numerically corroborated in both parabolic and step-index multimode silica waveguides. Effects arising from different soliton modal compositions can also be accounted for, using this model. At a more fundamental level, our results are expected to further facilitate our more » understanding of the underlying physics associated with these complex “many-body” nonlinear processes. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1912742
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10282676
Journal Name:
Communications Physics
Volume:
4
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2399-3650
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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