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This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2022

Title: HSKL: A Machine Learning Framework for Hyperspectral Image Analysis
A new framework for advanced machine learning-based analysis of hyperspectral datasets HSKL was built using the well-known package scikit-learn. In this paper, we describe HSKL’s structure and basic usage. We also showcase the diversity of models supported by the package by applying 17 classification algorithms and measure their baseline performance in segmenting objects with highly similar spectral properties.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1827656
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10283590
Journal Name:
2021 11th Workshop on Hyperspectral Imaging and Signal Processing: Evolution in Remote Sensing (WHISPERS)
ISSN:
2158-6276
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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