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Title: The Rhizosphere Responds: Rich Fen Peat and Root Microbial Ecology after Long-Term Water Table Manipulation
ABSTRACT Hydrologic shifts due to climate change will affect the cycling of carbon (C) stored in boreal peatlands. Carbon cycling in these systems is carried out by microorganisms and plants in close association. This study investigated the effects of experimentally manipulated water tables (lowered and raised) and plant functional groups on the peat and root microbiomes in a boreal rich fen. All samples were sequenced and processed for bacterial, archaeal (16S DNA genes; V4), and fungal (internal transcribed spacer 2 [ITS2]) DNA. Depth had a strong effect on microbial and fungal communities across all water table treatments. Bacterial and archaeal communities were most sensitive to the water table treatments, particularly at the 10- to 20-cm depth; this area coincides with the rhizosphere or rooting zone. Iron cyclers, particularly members of the family Geobacteraceae , were enriched around the roots of sedges, horsetails, and grasses. The fungal community was affected largely by plant functional group, especially cinquefoils. Fungal endophytes (particularly Acephala spp.) were enriched in sedge and grass roots, which may have underappreciated implications for organic matter breakdown and cycling. Fungal lignocellulose degraders were enriched in the lowered water table treatment. Our results were indicative of two main methanogen communities, a more » rooting zone community dominated by the archaeal family Methanobacteriaceae and a deep peat community dominated by the family Methanomicrobiaceae . IMPORTANCE This study demonstrated that roots and the rooting zone in boreal fens support organisms likely capable of methanogenesis, iron cycling, and fungal endophytic association and are directly or indirectly affecting carbon cycling in these ecosystems. These taxa, which react to changes in the water table and associate with roots and, particularly, graminoids, may gain greater biogeochemical influence, as projected higher precipitation rates could lead to an increased abundance of sedges and grasses in boreal fens. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Stams, Alfons J.
Award ID(s):
2011277 1636476 2011257
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10283988
Journal Name:
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume:
87
Issue:
12
ISSN:
0099-2240
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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