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Title: Changes in pairwise correlations during running reshape global network state in the main olfactory bulb
Neural codes for sensory inputs have been hypothesized to reside in a broader space defined by ongoing patterns of spontaneous activity. To understand the structure of this spontaneous activity in the olfactory system, we performed high-density recordings of neural populations in the main olfactory bulb of awake mice. We observed changes in pairwise correlations of spontaneous activity between mitral and tufted (M/T) cells when animals were running, which resulted in an increase in the entropy of the population. Surprisingly, pairwise maximum entropy models that described the population activity using only assumptions about the firing rates and correlations of neurons were better at predicting the global structure of activity when animals were stationary as compared to when they were running, implying that higher order (3rd, 4th order) interactions governed population activity during locomotion. Taken together, we found that locomotion alters the functional interactions that shape spontaneous population activity at the earliest stages of olfactory processing, one synapse away from the sensory receptors in the nasal epithelium. These data suggest that the coding space available for sensory representations responds adaptively to the animal’s behavioral state. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The organization and structure of spontaneous population activity in the olfactory system places constraints more » of how odor information is represented. Using high-density electrophysiological recordings of mitral and tufted cells, we found that running increases the dimensionality of spontaneous activity, implicating higher order interactions among neurons during locomotion. Behavior, thus, flexibly alters neuronal activity at the earliest stages of sensory processing. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1749772
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10285446
Journal Name:
Journal of Neurophysiology
Volume:
125
Issue:
5
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1612 to 1623
ISSN:
0022-3077
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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