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Title: Analysis of Orange County 311 System service requests during the COVID-19 pandemic
Orange County, Florida is intimately familiar with impacts of natural disasters because of the yearly threat of hurricanes in the southeastern United States. One of the tools that has aided them in their efforts to monitor and manage such disasters is their 311 non-emergency call system, through which local residents can issue requests to the municipality for disaster-related information or other services. This paper provides a preliminary examination of the potential for the Orange County 311 system to provide actionable information to them in support of their efforts to manage a different type of disaster: the COVID-19 pandemic. The potential of the system to support the County in this context is illustrated through several preliminary analyses of the complete set of service requests that were registered in the first ten months of 2020.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1952792
NSF-PAR ID:
10294149
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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