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Title: Scheduling Policy and Power Allocation for Federated Learning in NOMA based MEC
Federated learning (FL) is a highly pursued machine learning technique that can train a model centrally while keeping data distributed. Distributed computation makes FL attractive for bandwidth limited applications especially in wireless communications. There can be a large number of distributed edge devices connected to a central parameter server (PS) and iteratively download/upload data from/to the PS. Due to limited bandwidth, only a subset of connected devices can be scheduled in each round. There are usually millions of parameters in the state-of-art machine learning models such as deep learning, resulting in a high computation complexity as well as a high communication burden on collecting/distributing data for training. To improve communication efficiency and make the training model converge faster, we propose a new scheduling policy and power allocation scheme using non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) settings to maximize the weighted sum data rate under practical constraints during the entire learning process. NOMA allows multiple users to transmit on the same channel simultaneously. The user scheduling problem is transformed into a maximum-weight independent set problem that can be solved using graph theory. Simulation results show that the proposed scheduling and power allocation scheme can help achieve a higher FL testing accuracy in NOMA based wireless networks than other existing schemes within the same learning time.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2007995
NSF-PAR ID:
10295626
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE Globecom 2020
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 7
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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