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Title: Will it Move?: Indoor Scene Characterization for Hologram Stability in Mobile AR
Mobile Augmented Reality (AR) provides immersive experiences by aligning virtual content (holograms) with a view of the real world. When a user places a hologram it is usually expected that like a real object, it remains in the same place. However, positional errors frequently occur due to inaccurate environment mapping and device localization, to a large extent determined by the properties of natural visual features in the scene. In this demonstration we present SceneIt, the first visual environment rating system for mobile AR based on predictions of hologram positional error magnitude. SceneIt allows users to determine if virtual content placed in their environment will drift noticeably out of position, without requiring them to place that content. It shows that the severity of positional error for a given visual environment is predictable, and that this prediction can be calculated with sufficiently high accuracy and low latency to be useful in mobile AR applications.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1908051 1903136 1942700
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10296638
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 22nd International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
174 to 176
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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