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Title: Greening Electric Bike Sharing Using Solar Charging Stations
Electric bikes have emerged as a popular form of transportation for short trips in dense urban areas and are being increasingly adopted by bike share programs for easy accessibility to riders. Motivated by the rising popularity of electric bikes, a form of an electric vehicle, we study the research question of how to design a zero-carbon electric bike share system. Specifically we study the challenges in designing solar charging stations for electric bike systems that enable either net-zero or a fully zero-carbon operation. We design a prototype two bike solar charging station to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach. Using insights and data from our prototype solar charging station, we then conduct a data driven analysis of the costs and benefits of converting an entire bike system into one powered using solar charging stations. Using empirical analysis, we determine the panel and battery capacity for each station, and perform a feasibility evaluation of the system using 8 months of ridership data. Our results show that equipping each bike station with a single grid-tied solar panel is adequate to meet the annual charging demand from electric bikes and achieve net-zero operation using net-metering. For an off-grid setup, our analysis shows that more » a bike station needs twice as many solar panels, on average, along with a 1.8kWh battery, with the busiest bike station needing 6× more solar capacity than in the net-metering case. Our analysis also reveals a tradeoff between the array size and the battery size needed to achieve true-zero carbon operation for the electric bike share system. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1645952
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10298241
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 7th ACM International Conference on Systems for Energy-Efficient Buildings, Cities, and Transportation (BuildSys)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
180 to 189
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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