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Title: Agent-Based Computational Epidemiological Modeling
The study of epidemics is useful for not only understanding outbreaks and trying to limit their adverse effects, but also because epidemics are related to social phenomena such as government instability, crime, poverty, and inequality. One approach for studying epidemics is to simulate their spread through populations. In this work, we describe an integrated multi-dimensional approach to epidemic simulation, which encompasses: (i) a theoretical framework for simulation and analysis; (ii) synthetic population (digital twin) generation; (iii) (social contact) network construction methods from synthetic populations, (iv) stylized network construction methods; and (v) simulation of the evolution of a virus or disease through a social network. We describe these aspects and end with a short discussion on simulation results that inform public policy.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1916670
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10310251
Journal Name:
Journal of the Indian Institute of Science
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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