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Title: Bridging the Divide: Exploring Affordances for Interdisciplinary Learning
This study investigates how the design of hybrid mathematics and computational activities influences the ways in which students leverage ideas from both disciplinary topics. We examine two design cycles of a computer programming summer camp for middle school students which foreground computational thinking and then mathematics alongside computational thinking respectively. We review the rationale for each design iteration, the trends we saw in students’ engagement, and the implications for students’ reasoning. Findings of this study demonstrate the importance of thinking critically about the boundary objects that are included in design that support students to make bridges between multiple disciplinary practices.
Authors:
Editors:
de Vries, E.
Award ID(s):
1742257
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10311206
Journal Name:
Computersupported collaborative learning
Volume:
1
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1573-4552
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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