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Title: Accelerating complex modeling workflows in CyberWater using on-demand HPC/Cloud resources
Workflow management systems (WMSs) are commonly used to organize/automate sequences of tasks as workflows to accelerate scientific discoveries. During complex workflow modeling, a local interactive workflow environment is desirable, as users usually rely on their rich, local environments for fast prototyping and refinements before they consider using more powerful computing resources. However, existing WMSs do not simultaneously support local interactive workflow environments and HPC resources. In this paper, we present an on-demand access mechanism to remote HPC resources from desktop/laptopbased workflow management software to compose, monitor and analyze scientific workflows in the CyberWater project. Cyber- Water is an open-data and open-modeling software framework for environmental and water communities. In this work, we extend the open-model, open-data design of CyberWater with on-demand HPC accessing capacity. In particular, we design and implement the LaunchAgent library, which can be integrated into the local desktop environment to allow on-demand usage of remote resources for hydrology-related workflows. LaunchAgent manages authentication to remote resources, prepares the computationally-intensive or data-intensive tasks as batch jobs, submits jobs to remote resources, and monitors the quality of services for the users. LaunchAgent interacts seamlessly with other existing components in CyberWater, which is now able to provide advantages of both feature-rich desktop software experience and increased computation power through on-demand HPC/Cloud usage. In our evaluations, we demonstrate how a hydrology workflow that consists of both local and remote tasks more » can be constructed and show that the added on-demand HPC/Cloud usage helps speeding up hydrology workflows while allowing intuitive workflow configurations and execution using a desktop graphical user interface. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1835817 1835785
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10312424
Journal Name:
The 17th IEEE International Conference on eScience
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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