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This content will become publicly available on May 1, 2023

Title: Accelerating Scientific Workflows on HPC Platforms with In Situ Processing
Scientific workflows drive most modern large-scale science breakthroughs by allowing scientists to define their computations as a set of jobs executed in a given order based on their data dependencies. Workflow management systems (WMSs) have become key to automating scientific workflows-executing computational jobs and orchestrating data transfers between those jobs running on complex high-performance computing (HPC) platforms. Traditionally, WMSs use files to communicate between jobs: a job writes out files that are read by other jobs. However, HPC machines face a growing gap between their storage and compute capabilities. To address that concern, the scientific community has adopted a new approach called in situ, which bypasses costly parallel filesystem I/O operations with faster in-memory or in-network communications. When using in situ approaches, communication and computations can be interleaved. In this work, we leverage the Decaf in situ dataflow framework to accelerate task-based scientific workflows managed by the Pegasus WMS, by replacing file communications with faster MPI messaging. We propose a new execution engine that uses Decaf to manage communications within a sub-workflow (i.e., set of jobs) to optimize inter-job communications. We consider two workflows in this study: (i) a synthetic workflow that benchmarks and compares file- and MPI-based communication; and more » (ii) a realistic bioinformatics workflow that computes mu-tational overlaps in the human genome. Experiments show that in situ communication can improve the bioinformatics workflow execution time by 22% to 30% compared with file communication. Our results motivate further opportunities and challenges for bridging traditional WMSs with in situ frameworks. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1841758
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10355276
Journal Name:
2022 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Cluster, Cloud and Internet Computing (CCGrid)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 10
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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