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Title: Graph Compression Networks
Graphs/Networks are common in real-world applications where data have rich content and complex relationships. The increasing popularity also motivates many network learning algorithms, such as community detection, clustering, classification, and embedding learning, etc.. In reality, the large network volumes often hider a direct use of learning algorithms to the graphs. As a result, it is desirable to have the flexibility to condense a network to an arbitrary size, with well-preserved network topology and node content information. In this paper, we propose a graph compression network (GEN) to achieve network compression and embedding at the same time. Our theme is to leverage the network topology to find node mappings, such that densely connected nodes, including their node content, are compressed as a new node, with a latent vector (i.e. embedding) being learned to represent the compressed node. In addition to compression learning, we also develop a novel encoding-decoding framework, using feature diffusion process, to "decompress" the condensed network. Different from traditional graph convolution which uses direct-neighbor message passing, our decompression advocates high-order message passing within compressed nodes to learning feature representation for all nodes in the network. A unique strength of GEN is that it leverages the graph neural network principle to learn mapping automatically, so one can compress a network to an arbitrary size, and also decompress it to the original node space with minimum information loss. Experiments and comparisons confirm that GEN can automatically find clusters and communities, and compress them as new nodes. Results also show that GEN achieves improved performance for numerous tasks, including graph classification and node clustering.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1763452 1828181 2027339
NSF-PAR ID:
10314151
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proc. of the 2021 IEEE International Conference on Big Data (Big Data)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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