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Title: Benchmark Angle-Differential Cross-Section Ratios for Excitation of the 4p5s Configuration in Krypton
Benchmark intensity ratio measurements of the energy loss lines of krypton for excitation of the 4p61S0→4p55s[3/2]2, 4p55s[3/2]1, 4p55s′[1/2]0, and 4p55s′[1/2]1 transitions are reported, these being the lowest electronic excitations for krypton. The importance of these ratios as stringent tests of theoretical electron scattering models for the noble gases is discussed, as well as the role of spin-exchange and direct processes regarding the angular dependence of these ratios. The experimental data are compared with predictions from fully-relativistic B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) calculations.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1834740 1803844 2110023
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10317810
Journal Name:
Atoms
Volume:
9
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2218-2004
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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