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Title: Permchecker: a toolchain for debugging memory managers with typestate
Dynamic memory managers are a crucial component of almost every modern software system. In addition to implementing efficient allocation and reclamation, memory managers provide the essential abstraction of memory as distinct objects, which underpins the properties of memory safety and type safety. Bugs in memory managers, while not common, are extremely hard to diagnose and fix. One reason is that their implementations often involve tricky pointer calculations, raw memory manipulation, and complex memory state invariants. While these properties are often documented, they are not specified in any precise, machine-checkable form. A second reason is that memory manager bugs can break the client application in bizarre ways that do not immediately implicate the memory manager at all. A third reason is that existing tools for debugging memory errors, such as Memcheck, cannot help because they rely on correct allocation and deallocation information to work. In this paper we present Permchecker, a tool designed specifically to detect and diagnose bugs in memory managers. The key idea in Permchecker is to make the expected structure of the heap explicit by associating typestates with each piece of memory. Typestate captures elements of both type (e.g., page, block, or cell) and state (e.g., allocated, free, or forwarded). Memory manager developers annotate their implementation with information about the expected typestates of memory and how heap operations change those typestates. At runtime, our system tracks the typestates and ensures that each memory access is consistent with the expected typestates. This technique detects errors quickly, before they corrupt the application or the memory manager itself, and it often provides accurate information about the reason for the error. The implementation of Permchecker uses a combination of compile-time annotation and instrumentation, and dynamic binary instrumentation (DBI). Because the overhead of DBI is fairly high, Permchecker is suitable for a testing and debugging setting and not for deployment. It works on a wide variety of existing systems, including explicit malloc/free memory managers and garbage collectors, such as those found in JikesRVM and OpenJDK. Since bugs in these systems are not numerous, we developed a testing methodology in which we automatically inject bugs into the code using bug patterns derived from real bugs. This technique allows us to test Permchecker on hundreds or thousands of buggy variants of the code. We find that Permchecker effectively detects and localizes errors in the vast majority of cases; without it, these bugs result in strange, incorrect behaviors usually long after the actual error occurs.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1717373
NSF-PAR ID:
10319106
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages
Volume:
5
Issue:
OOPSLA
ISSN:
2475-1421
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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