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Title: Performance of Carbide Alloy Compounds in Carbon Doped MoNbTaW
In this work, the performance of the carbon doped compositionally complex alloy (CCA) MoNbTaW was studied under ambient and high pressure and high temperature conditions. TaC and NbC carbides were formed when a large concentration of carbon was introduced while synthesizing the MoNbTaW alloy. Both FCC carbides and BCC CCA phases were detected in the sample compound at room temperature, in which the BCC phase was believed to have only refractory elements MoNbTaW while FCC carbide came from TaC and NbC. Carbides in the carbon doped MoNbTaW alloy were very stable since no phase transition was obtained even under 3.1 GPa and 870 °C by employing the resistor-heating diamond anvil cell (DAC) synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. Via in situ examination, this study confirms the stability of carbides and MoNbTaW in the carbon doped CCA even under high pressure and high temperature.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1946231
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10319334
Journal Name:
Crystals
Volume:
11
Issue:
9
ISSN:
2073-4352
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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