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Title: Key words related to public engagement with science by Society of Freshwater Science journals and conference sessions (1997-2019)
Abstract
Data set that was used to determine the frequency each of 4 key words (public engagement, education, outreach, or science communication) in the title or abstract of published papersMore>>
Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher:
Dryad
Publication Year:
NSF-PAR ID:
10322700
Subject(s):
public engagement with science exhibit design outreach informal science education science communication
Size(s):
26438 bytes
Version:
2
Award ID(s):
1757207
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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