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This content will become publicly available on February 22, 2023

Title: Biocompatible surface functionalization architecture for a diamond quantum sensor
Quantum metrology enables some of the most precise measurements. In the life sciences, diamond-based quantum sensing has led to a new class of biophysical sensors and diagnostic devices that are being investigated as a platform for cancer screening and ultrasensitive immunoassays. However, a broader application in the life sciences based on nanoscale NMR spectroscopy has been hampered by the need to interface highly sensitive quantum bit (qubit) sensors with their biological targets. Here, we demonstrate an approach that combines quantum engineering with single-molecule biophysics to immobilize individual proteins and DNA molecules on the surface of a bulk diamond crystal that hosts coherent nitrogen vacancy qubit sensors. Our thin (sub–5 nm) functionalization architecture provides precise control over the biomolecule adsorption density and results in near-surface qubit coherence approaching 100 μs. The developed architecture remains chemically stable under physiological conditions for over 5 d, making our technique compatible with most biophysical and biomedical applications.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2011750 2011854 2121044 2040520 1936118
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10325150
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
119
Issue:
8
ISSN:
0027-8424
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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