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This content will become publicly available on December 3, 2022

Title: Probing topological spin liquids on a programmable quantum simulator
Quantum spin liquids, exotic phases of matter with topological order, have been a major focus in physics for the past several decades. Such phases feature long-range quantum entanglement that can potentially be exploited to realize robust quantum computation. We used a 219-atom programmable quantum simulator to probe quantum spin liquid states. In our approach, arrays of atoms were placed on the links of a kagome lattice, and evolution under Rydberg blockade created frustrated quantum states with no local order. The onset of a quantum spin liquid phase of the paradigmatic toric code type was detected by using topological string operators that provide direct signatures of topological order and quantum correlations. Our observations enable the controlled experimental exploration of topological matter and protected quantum information processing.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1734011
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10326562
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
374
Issue:
6572
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1242 to 1247
ISSN:
0036-8075
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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