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Title: From EMBER to FIRE: predicting high resolution baryon fields from dark matter simulations with deep learning
ABSTRACT Hydrodynamic simulations provide a powerful, but computationally expensive, approach to study the interplay of dark matter and baryons in cosmological structure formation. Here, we introduce the EMulating Baryonic EnRichment (EMBER) Deep Learning framework to predict baryon fields based on dark matter-only simulations thereby reducing computational cost. EMBER comprises two network architectures, U-Net and Wasserstein Generative Adversarial Networks (WGANs), to predict 2D gas and H i densities from dark matter fields. We design the conditional WGANs as stochastic emulators, such that multiple target fields can be sampled from the same dark matter input. For training we combine cosmological volume and zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to represent a large range of scales. Our fiducial WGAN model reproduces the gas and H i power spectra within 10 per cent accuracy down to ∼10 kpc scales. Furthermore, we investigate the capability of EMBER to predict high resolution baryon fields from low resolution dark matter inputs through upsampling techniques. As a practical application, we use this methodology to emulate high-resolution H i maps for a dark matter simulation of a $L=100\, \text{Mpc}\, h^{ -1}$ comoving cosmological box. The gas content of dark matter haloes and the H i column density distributions predicted by EMBER more » agree well with results of large volume cosmological simulations and abundance matching models. Our method provides a computationally efficient, stochastic emulator for augmenting dark matter only simulations with physically consistent maps of baryon fields. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2009687 1910346 1752913 2108944
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10331332
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
509
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1323 to 1341
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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