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Title: Augmentation Strategies for Learning with Noisy Labels
Imperfect labels are ubiquitous in real-world datasets. Several recent successful methods for training deep neural networks (DNNs) robust to label noise have used two primary techniques: filtering samples based on loss during a warm-up phase to curate an initial set of cleanly labeled samples, and using the output of a network as a pseudo-label for subsequent loss calculations. In this paper, we evaluate different augmentation strategies for algorithms tackling the "learning with noisy labels" problem. We propose and examine multiple augmentation strategies and evaluate them using synthetic datasets based on CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100, as well as on the real-world dataset Clothing1M. Due to several commonalities in these algorithms, we find that using one set of augmentations for loss modeling tasks and another set for learning is the most effective, improving results on the state-of-the-art and other previous methods. Furthermore, we find that applying augmentation during the warm-up period can negatively impact the loss convergence behavior of correctly versus incorrectly labeled samples. We introduce this augmentation strategy to the state-of-the-art technique and demonstrate that we can improve performance across all evaluated noise levels. In particular, we improve accuracy on the CIFAR-10 benchmark at 90% symmetric noise by more than 15% in absolute accuracy, and we also improve performance on the Clothing1M dataset.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1845587 1911230
NSF-PAR ID:
10332223
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2021 IEEE/CVF Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
8018 to 8027
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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