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This content will become publicly available on December 15, 2022

Title: REFORM: Fast and Adaptive Solution for Subteam Replacement
Subteam Replacement: given a team of people em- bedded in a social network to complete a certain task, and a subset of members (i.e., subteam) in this team which have become unavailable, find another set of people who can perform the subteam’s role in the larger team. We conjecture that a good candidate subteam should have high skill and structural similarity with the replaced subteam while sharing a similar connection with the larger team as a whole. Based on this conjecture, we propose a novel graph kernel which evaluates the goodness of candidate subteams in this holistic way freely adjustable to the need of the situation. To tackle the significant computational difficulties, we equip our kernel with a fast approximation algorithm which (a) employs effective pruning strategies, (b) exploits the similarity between candidate team structures to reduce kernel computations, and (c) features a solid theoretical bound on the quality of the obtained solution. We extensively test our solution on both synthetic and real datasets to demonstrate its effectiveness and efficiency. Our proposed graph kernel outputs more human-agreeable recommendations compared to metrics used in previous work, and our algorithm consistently outperforms alternative choices by finding near- optimal solutions while scaling linearly more » with the size of the replaced subteam. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1939725 1947135
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10332508
Journal Name:
REFORM: Fast and Adaptive Solution for Subteam Replacement
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
350 to 358
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Figure 2 shows that participants had a variety of specialisations, including some that are in no way related to data science, software engineering, or neuroscience. No participant had deep knowledge and experience in data science, software engineering and neuroscience. Conclusion Given the growing complexity of data science problems and increasing dataset sizes, in order to solve these problems, it is imperative to enable collaboration between people with differences in expertise with a focus on inclusiveness and having a low barrier of entry. We designed, implemented, and tested a challenge platform to address exactly this. Using our platform, we ran a deep-learning challenge for epileptic seizure detection. 87 IBM employees from several business units including but not limited to IBM Research with a variety of skills, including sales and design, participated in this highly technical challenge.« less