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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2022

Title: Sparta: Heat-Budget-Based Scheduling Framework on IoT Edge Systems
Co-location of processing infrastructure and IoT devices at the edge is used to reduce response latency and long-haul network use for IoT applications. As a result, edge clouds for many applications (e.g. agriculture, ecology, and smart city deployments) must operate in remote, unattended, and environmentally harsh settings, introducing new challenges. One key challenge is heat exposure, which can degrade the performance, reliability, and longevity of electronics. For edge clouds, these problems are exacerbated because they increasingly perform complex workloads, such as machine learning, to affect data-driven actuation and control of devices and systems in the environment. The goal of our work is to protect edge clouds from overheating. To enable this, we develop a heat-budget-based scheduling system, called Sparta, which leverages dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) to adaptively control CPU temperature. Sparta takes machine learning applications, datasets, and a temperature threshold as input. It sets the initial frequency of the CPU based on historical data and then dynamically updates it, according to the applications’ execution profile and ambient temperature, to safeguard edge devices. We find that for a suite of machine learning applications and deployment temperatures, Sparta is able to maintain CPU temperature below the threshold 94% of the time more » while facilitating improvements in execution time by 1.04x − 1.32x over competitive approaches. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
2107101 2027977 1703560
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10334318
Journal Name:
Edge Computing
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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