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Title: Spectral stability of pattern-forming fronts in the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation with a quenching mechanism
Abstract We consider pattern-forming fronts in the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation with a traveling spatial heterogeneity which destabilises, or quenches, the trivial ground state while progressing through the domain. We consider the regime where the heterogeneity propagates with speed c just below the linear invasion speed of the pattern-forming front in the associated homogeneous system. In this situation, the front locks to the interface of the heterogeneity leaving a long intermediate state lying near the unstable ground state, possibly allowing for growth of perturbations. This manifests itself in the spectrum of the linearisation about the front through the accumulation of eigenvalues onto the absolute spectrum associated with the unstable ground state. As the quench speed c increases towards the linear invasion speed, the absolute spectrum stabilises with the same rate at which eigenvalues accumulate onto it allowing us to rigorously establish spectral stability of the front in L 2 ( R ) . The presence of unstable absolute spectrum poses a technical challenge as spatial eigenvalues along the intermediate state no longer admit a hyperbolic splitting and standard tools such as exponential dichotomies are unavailable. Instead, we projectivise the linear flow, and use Riemann surface unfolding in combination with a superposition more » principle to study the evolution of subspaces as solutions to the associated matrix Riccati differential equation on the Grassmannian manifold. Eigenvalues can then be identified as the roots of the meromorphic Riccati–Evans function, and can be located using winding number and parity arguments. « less
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
2006887
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10335777
Journal Name:
Nonlinearity
Volume:
35
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
170 to 244
ISSN:
0951-7715
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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We used a variety of techniques such as the file locking mechanism, multithreading, circular buffers, real-time event decoding, and signal-decision plotting to realize the system. A video demonstrating the system is available at: https://www.isip.piconepress.com/projects/nsf_pfi_tt/resources/videos/realtime_eeg_analysis/v2.5.1/video_2.5.1.mp4. The final conference submission will include a more detailed analysis of the online performance of each module. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Research reported in this publication was most recently supported by the National Science Foundation Partnership for Innovation award number IIP-1827565 and the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement Program (PA CURE). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official views of any of these organizations. REFERENCES [1] A. Craik, Y. He, and J. L. Contreras-Vidal, “Deep learning for electroencephalogram (EEG) classification tasks: a review,” J. Neural Eng., vol. 16, no. 3, p. 031001, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/ab0ab5. [2] A. C. Bridi, T. Q. Louro, and R. C. L. Da Silva, “Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients,” Rev. Lat. Am. Enfermagem, vol. 22, no. 6, p. 1034, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1590/0104-1169.3488.2513. [3] M. Golmohammadi, V. Shah, I. Obeid, and J. Picone, “Deep Learning Approaches for Automatic Seizure Detection from Scalp Electroencephalograms,” in Signal Processing in Medicine and Biology: Emerging Trends in Research and Applications, 1st ed., I. Obeid, I. Selesnick, and J. Picone, Eds. New York, New York, USA: Springer, 2020, pp. 233–274. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-36844-9_8. [4] “CFM Olympic Brainz Monitor.” [Online]. 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