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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2023

Title: New horizons for fundamental physics with LISA
Abstract The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) has the potential to reveal wonders about the fundamental theory of nature at play in the extreme gravity regime, where the gravitational interaction is both strong and dynamical. In this white paper, the Fundamental Physics Working Group of the LISA Consortium summarizes the current topics in fundamental physics where LISA observations of gravitational waves can be expected to provide key input. We provide the briefest of reviews to then delineate avenues for future research directions and to discuss connections between this working group, other working groups and the consortium work package teams. These connections must be developed for LISA to live up to its science potential in these areas.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2110416 2004879 2006538
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10337402
Journal Name:
Living Reviews in Relativity
Volume:
25
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2367-3613
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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