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Title: Search for low-energy signals from fast radio bursts with the Borexino detector
Abstract The search for neutrino events in correlation with 42 most intense fast radio bursts (FRBs) has been performed using the Borexino dataset from 05/2007 to 06/2021. We have searched for signals with visible energies above 250 keV within a time window of $$\pm \, 1000$$ ± 1000  s corresponding to detection time of a particular FRB. We also applied an alternative approach based on searching for specific shapes of neutrino-electron scattering spectra in the full exposure data of the Borexino detector. In particular, two incoming neutrino spectra were considered: the monoenergetic line and the spectrum expected from supernovae. The same spectra were considered for electron antineutrinos detected through inverse beta-decay reaction. No statistically significant excess over the background was observed. As a result, the strongest upper limits on FRB-associated neutrino fluences of all flavors have been obtained in the 0.5–50 MeV neutrino energy range.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1821085 1821071
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10337789
Journal Name:
The European Physical Journal C
Volume:
82
Issue:
3
ISSN:
1434-6044
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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