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This content will become publicly available on April 12, 2023

Title: Measurement of the H3∆₁ Radiative Lifetime in ThO
The best limit on the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) comes from the ACME II experiment [Nature \textbf{562} (2018), 355-360] which probes physics beyond the Standard Model at energy scales well above 1 TeV. ACME II measured the eEDM by monitoring electron spin precession in a cold beam of the metastable H3Δ1 state of thorium monoxide (ThO) molecules, with an observation time τ≈1 ms for each molecule. We report here a new measurement of the lifetime of the ThO (H3Δ1) state, τH=4.2±0.5 ms. Using an apparatus within which τ≈τH will enable a substantial reduction in uncertainty of an eEDM measurement.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2136573
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10342313
Journal Name:
ArXivorg
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2204.05904
ISSN:
2331-8422
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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