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Title: QDiff: Differential Testing of Quantum Software Stacks
Over the past few years, several quantum software stacks (QSS) have been developed in response to rapid hardware advances in quantum computing. A QSS includes a quantum programming language, an optimizing compiler that translates a quantum algorithm written in a high-level language into quantum gate instructions, a quantum simulator that emulates these instructions on a classical device, and a software controller that sends analog signals to a very expensive quantum hardware based on quantum circuits. In comparison to traditional compilers and architecture simulators, QSSes are difficult to tests due to the probabilistic nature of results, the lack of clear hardware specifications, and quantum programming complexity. This work devises a novel differential testing approach for QSSes, named QDIFF with three major innovations: (1) We generate input programs to be tested via semantics-preserving, source to source transformation to explore program variants. (2) We speed up differential testing by filtering out quantum circuits that are not worthwhile to execute on quantum hardware by analyzing static characteristics such as a circuit depth, 2-gate operations, gate error rates, and T1 relaxation time. (3) We design an extensible equivalence checking mechanism via distribution comparison functions such as Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and cross entropy. We evaluate QDiff with three widely-used open source QSSes: Qiskit from IBM, Cirq from Google, and Pyquil from Rigetti. By running QDiff on both real hardware and quantum simulators, we found several critical bugs revealing potential instabilities in these platforms. QDiff's source transformation is effective in producing semantically equivalent yet not-identical circuits (i.e., 34% of trials), and its filtering mechanism can speed up differential testing by 66%.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2106404 1723773
NSF-PAR ID:
10342994
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ASE '21: Proceedings of the 36th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering
Page Range / eLocation ID:
692 to 704
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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