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Title: COPII Sec23 proteins form isoform-specific endoplasmic reticulum exit sites with differential effects on polarized growth
Abstract Coat Protein complex II (COPII), a coat protein complex that forms vesicles on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mediates trafficking to the Golgi. While metazoans have few genes encoding each COPII component, plants have expanded these gene families, leading to the hypothesis that plant COPII has functionally diversified. In the moss Physcomitrium (Physcomitrella) patens, the Sec23/24 gene families are each composed of seven genes. Silencing Sec23/24 revealed isoform-specific contributions to polarized growth, with the closely related Sec23D/E and Sec24C/D essential for protonemal development. Focusing on Sec23, we discovered that Sec23D/E mediate ER-to Golgi transport and are essential for tip growth, with Sec23D localizing to presumptive ER exit sites. In contrast, Sec23A, B, C, F, and G are dispensable and do not quantitatively affect ER-to-Golgi trafficking. However, Δsec23abcfg plants exhibited reduced secretion of plasma membrane cargo. Of the four highly expressed protonemal Sec23 genes, Sec23F/G are members of a divergent Sec23 clade specifically retained in land plants. Notably, Sec23G accumulates on ER-associated foci that are significantly larger, do not overlap with, and are independent of Sec23D. While Sec23D/E form ER exit sites and function as bona fide COPII components essential for tip-growing protonemata, Sec23G and the closely related Sec23F have likely functionally diversified, forming separate and independent ER exit sites and participating in Golgi-independent trafficking pathways.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1826903
NSF-PAR ID:
10344650
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Plant Cell
Volume:
34
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1040-4651
Page Range / eLocation ID:
333 to 350
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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