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This content will become publicly available on May 10, 2023

Title: OGLE-2016-BLG-1093Lb: A Sub-Jupiter-mass Spitzer Planet Located in the Galactic Bulge
Abstract OGLE-2016-BLG-1093 is a planetary microlensing event that is part of the statistical Spitzer microlens parallax sample. The precise measurement of the microlens parallax effect for this event, combined with the measurement of finite-source effects, leads to a direct measurement of the lens masses and system distance, M host =0.38–0.57 M ⊙ and m p = 0.59–0.87 M Jup , and the system is located at the Galactic bulge ( D L ∼ 8.1 kpc). Because this was a high-magnification event, we are also able to empirically show that the “cheap-space parallax” concept produces well-constrained (and consistent) results for ∣ π E ∣. This demonstrates that this concept can be extended to many two-body lenses. Finally, we briefly explore systematics in the Spitzer light curve in this event and show that their potential impact is strongly mitigated by the color constraint.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2108414
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10346371
Journal Name:
The Astronomical Journal
Volume:
163
Issue:
6
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
254
ISSN:
0004-6256
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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