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Title: End-to-End Image Classification and Compression with variational autoencoders
The past decade has witnessed the rising dominance of deep learning and artificial intelligence in a wide range of applications. In particular, the ocean of wireless smartphones and IoT devices continue to fuel the tremendous growth of edge/cloudbased machine learning (ML) systems including image/speech recognition and classification. To overcome the infrastructural barrier of limited network bandwidth in cloud ML, existing solutions have mainly relied on traditional compression codecs such as JPEG that were historically engineered for humanend users instead of ML algorithms. Traditional codecs do not necessarily preserve features important to ML algorithms under limited bandwidth, leading to potentially inferior performance. This work investigates application-driven optimization of programmable commercial codec settings for networked learning tasks such as image classification. Based on the foundation of variational autoencoders (VAEs), we develop an end-to-end networked learning framework by jointly optimizing the codec and classifier without reconstructing images for given data rate (bandwidth). Compared with standard JPEG codec, the proposed VAE joint compression and classification framework achieves classification accuracy improvement by over 10% and 4%, respectively, for CIFAR-10 and ImageNet-1k data sets at data rate of 0.8 bpp. Our proposed VAE-based models show 65%􀀀99% reductions in encoder size,  1.5􀀀 13.1 improvements in inference speed and 25%􀀀99% savings in power compared to baseline models. We further show that a simple decoder can reconstruct images with sufficient quality without compromising classification accuracy.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2002937 2029027
NSF-PAR ID:
10347113
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE Internet of Things Journal
ISSN:
2372-2541
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 1
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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