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Title: Eighteen-year record of circum-Antarctic landfast-sea-ice distribution allows detailed baseline characterisation and reveals trends and variability
Abstract. Landfast sea ice (fast ice) is an important though poorly understood component of the cryosphere on the Antarctic continental shelf, where it plays a key role in atmosphere–ocean–ice-sheet interaction and coupled ecological and biogeochemical processes. Here, we present a first in-depth baseline analysis of variability and change in circum-Antarctic fast-ice distribution (including its relationship to bathymetry), based on a new high-resolution satellite-derived time series for the period 2000 to 2018. This reveals (a) an overall trend of -882±824 km2 yr−1 (-0.19±0.18 % yr−1) and (b) eight distinct regions in terms of fast-ice coverage and modes of formation. Of these, four exhibit positive trends over the 18-year period and four negative. Positive trends are seen in East Antarctica and in the Bellingshausen Sea, with this region claiming the largest positive trend of +1198±359 km2 yr−1 (+1.10±0.35 % yr−1). The four negative trends predominantly occur in West Antarctica, with the largest negative trend of -1206±277 km2 yr−1 (-1.78±0.41 % yr−1) occurring in the Victoria and Oates Land region in the western Ross Sea. All trends are significant. This new baseline analysis represents a significant advance in our knowledge of the current state of both the global cryosphere and the complex Antarctic coastal system, which are vulnerable to climate variability and change. It will also inform a wide more » range of other studies. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1745089
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10352299
Journal Name:
The Cryosphere
Volume:
15
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
5061 to 5077
ISSN:
1994-0424
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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