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Title: A Friendly Interference Game in Wireless Secret Communication Networks
This paper considers a parallel wireless network in which multiple individuals exchange confidential information through independent sender-receiver links. An eavesdropper can intercept encrypted information through a degraded channel of each sender-receiver link. A friendly jammer, by applying interference to the eavesdropping channels, can increase the level of secrecy of the network. The optimal power allocation strategy of the friendly jammer under a power constraint is derived. A convex optimization model is used when all channels are under the threat of an eavesdropping attack and a non-zero sum game model is analyzed when the eavesdropper can only attack a limited quantity of channels.
Authors:
;
Editors:
Filipe J.; Ghosh A.; Prates R. O.; Zhou L.
Award ID(s):
1901721
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10353167
Journal Name:
10th International Conference on NETwork Games, COntrol and OPtimization (NetGCOOP)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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