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Title: A Game-Theoretic Approach for Probabilistic Cooperative Jamming Strategies over Parallel Wireless Channels
Considered is a network of parallel wireless channels in which individual parties are engaged in secret communication under the protection of cooperative jamming. A strategic eavesdropper selects the most vulnerable channels to attack. Existing works usually suggest the defender allocate limited cooperative jamming power to various channels. However, it usually requires some strong assumptions and complex computation to find such an optimal power control policy. This paper proposes a probabilistic cooperative jamming scheme such that the defender focuses on protecting randomly selected channels. Two different cases regarding each channel’s eavesdropping capacity are discussed. The first case studies the general scenario where each channel has different eavesdropping capacity. The second case analyzes an extreme scenario where all channels have the same eavesdropping capacity. Two non-zero-sum Nash games model the competition between the network defender and an eavesdropper in each case. Furthermore, considering the case that the defender does not know the eavesdropper’s channel state information (CSI) leads to a Bayesian game. For all three games, we derive conditions for the existence of a unique Nash equilibrium (NE), and obtain the equilibria and the value functions in closed form.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1901721
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10353172
Journal Name:
2021 IEEE Conference on Communications and Network Security (CNS)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
47 to 55
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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