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Title: Knowledge-aware Coupled Graph Neural Network for Social Recommendation
Social recommendation task aims to predict users' preferences over items with the incorporation of social connections among users, so as to alleviate the sparse issue of collaborative filtering. While many recent efforts show the effectiveness of neural network-based social recommender systems, several important challenges have not been well addressed yet: (i) The majority of models only consider users’ social connections, while ignoring the inter-dependent knowledge across items; (ii) Most of existing solutions are designed for singular type of user-item interactions, making them infeasible to capture the interaction heterogeneity; (iii) The dynamic nature of user-item interactions has been less explored in many social-aware recommendation techniques. To tackle the above challenges, this work proposes a Knowledge-aware Coupled Graph Neural Network (KCGN) that jointly injects the inter-dependent knowledge across items and users into the recommendation framework. KCGN enables the high-order user- and item-wise relation encoding by exploiting the mutual information for global graph structure awareness. Additionally, we further augment KCGN with the capability of capturing dynamic multi-typed user-item interactive patterns. Experimental studies on real-world datasets show the effectiveness of our method against many strong baselines in a variety of settings. Source codes are available at: https://github.com/xhcdream/KCGN.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2217239
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10358132
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Volume:
35
Issue:
5
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4115 to 4122
ISSN:
2159-5399
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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