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This content will become publicly available on February 7, 2023

Title: Radioactive nuclei in the early Solar system: analysis of the 15 isotopes produced by core-collapse supernovae
ABSTRACT Short-lived radioactive isotopes (SLRs) with half-lives between 0.1 and 100 Myr can be used to probe the origin of the Solar system. In this work, we examine the core-collapse supernovae production of the 15 SLRs produced: 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 53Mn, 60Fe, 92Nb, 97Tc, 98Tc, 107Pd, 126Sn, 129I, 135Cs, 146Sm, 182Hf, and 205Pb. We probe the impact of the uncertainties of the core-collapse explosion mechanism by examining a collection of 62 core-collapse models with initial masses of 15, 20, and 25 M⊙, explosion energies between 3.4 × 1050 and 1.8 × 1052 erg and compact remnant masses between 1.5 and 4.89 M⊙. We identify the impact of both explosion energy and remnant mass on the final yields of the SLRs. Isotopes produced within the innermost regions of the star, such as 92Nb and 97Tc, are the most affected by the remnant mass, 92Nb varying by five orders of magnitude. Isotopes synthesized primarily in explosive C-burning and explosive He-burning, such as 60Fe, are most affected by explosion energies. 60Fe increases by two orders of magnitude from the lowest to the highest explosion energy in the 15 M⊙ model. The final yield of each examined SLR is used to compare to literature models.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1913554
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10358352
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
511
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
886 to 902
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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