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This content will become publicly available on September 30, 2023

Title: Information Exchange for Supporting BIM to Robotic Construction
In the past, the construction industry has been slow to adopt new technology. There has been a rapid expansion of technologies, often referred to as Industry 4.0, to aid in the use of automation. One challenge paralleling these new technologies is implementing how a robot interprets design information, specifically information from a Building Information Model (BIM). This paper presents a method for identifying and transforming information from BIM to support robotic material placement on the construction site. This research will include a review of what information can be directly extracted from the model and what must be supplemented to the model for the robot to perform defined tasks within a construction site. The construction sites’ dynamic nature poses multiple challenges that must be addressed for the information extracted from a model to be used by a robot in daily construction operations. This research also identifies barriers and limitations based upon current practice, such as different levels of development or model content as well as needed precision within the information provided for a mobile robot to complete a defined task.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1928626
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10358892
Journal Name:
ASCE Construction Research Congress
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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