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Title: Long wavelength interband cascade lasers

InAs-based interband cascade lasers (ICLs) can be more easily adapted toward long wavelength operation than their GaSb counterparts. Devices made from two recent ICL wafers with an advanced waveguide structure are reported, which demonstrate improved device performance in terms of reduced threshold current densities for ICLs near 11  μm or extended operating wavelength beyond 13  μm. The ICLs near 11  μm yielded a significantly reduced continuous wave (cw) lasing threshold of 23 A/cm2at 80 K with substantially increased cw output power, compared with previously reported ICLs at similar wavelengths. ICLs made from the second wafer incorporated an innovative quantum well active region, comprised of InAsP layers, and lased in the pulsed-mode up to 120 K at 13.2  μm, which is the longest wavelength achieved for III–V interband lasers.

Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Award ID(s):
1931193
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10363582
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Volume:
120
Issue:
9
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 091105
ISSN:
0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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