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Title: Deciphering the mechanism of the Ni-photocatalyzed C‒O cross-coupling reaction using a tridentate pyridinophane ligand
Abstract

Photoredox nickel catalysis has emerged as a powerful strategy for cross-coupling reactions. Although the involvement of paramagnetic Ni(I)/Ni(III) species as active intermediates in the catalytic cycle has been proposed, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of these species is lacking. Herein, we report the tridentate pyridinophane ligandsRN3 that allow for detailed mechanistic studies of the photocatalytic C–O coupling reaction. The derived (RN3)Ni complexes are active catalysts under mild conditions and without an additional photocatalyst. We also provide direct evidence for the key steps involving paramagnetic Ni species in the proposed catalytic cycle: the oxidative addition of an aryl halide to a Ni(I) species, the ligand exchange/transmetalation at a Ni(III) center, and the C–O reductive elimination from a Ni(III) species. Overall, the present work suggests theRN3 ligands are a practical platform for mechanistic studies of Ni-catalyzed reactions and for the development of new catalytic applications.

 
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Award ID(s):
1925751
NSF-PAR ID:
10364089
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
13
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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