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Title: Parameterized cast calculi and reusable meta-theory for gradually typed lambda calculi
Abstract The research on gradual typing has led to many variations on the Gradually Typed Lambda Calculus (GTLC) of Siek & Taha (2006) and its underlying cast calculus. For example, Wadler and Findler (2009) added blame tracking, Siek et al . (2009) investigated alternate cast evaluation strategies, and Herman et al . (2010) replaced casts with coercions for space efficiency. The meta-theory for the GTLC has also expanded beyond type safety to include blame safety (Tobin-Hochstadt & Felleisen, 2006), space consumption (Herman et al ., 2010), and the gradual guarantees (Siek et al ., 2015). These results have been proven for some variations of the GTLC but not others. Furthermore, researchers continue to develop variations on the GTLC, but establishing all of the meta-theory for new variations is time-consuming. This article identifies abstractions that capture similarities between many cast calculi in the form of two parameterized cast calculi, one for the purposes of language specification and the other to guide space-efficient implementations. The article then develops reusable meta-theory for these two calculi, proving type safety, blame safety, the gradual guarantees, and space consumption. Finally, the article instantiates this meta-theory for eight cast calculi including five from the literature and three new calculi. All of these definitions and theorems, including the two parameterized calculi, the reusable meta-theory, and the eight instantiations, are mechanized in Agda making extensive use of module parameters and dependent records to define the abstractions.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1763922
NSF-PAR ID:
10366052
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Functional Programming
Volume:
31
ISSN:
0956-7968
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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