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Title: Reactive task and motion planning for robust whole-body dynamic locomotion in constrained environments

Contact-based decision and planning methods are becoming increasingly important to endow higher levels of autonomy for legged robots. Formal synthesis methods derived from symbolic systems have great potential for reasoning about high-level locomotion decisions and achieving complex maneuvering behaviors with correctness guarantees. This study takes a first step toward formally devising an architecture composed of task planning and control of whole-body dynamic locomotion behaviors in constrained and dynamically changing environments. At the high level, we formulate a two-player temporal logic game between the multi-limb locomotion planner and its dynamic environment to synthesize a winning strategy that delivers symbolic locomotion actions. These locomotion actions satisfy the desired high-level task specifications expressed in a fragment of temporal logic. Those actions are sent to a robust finite transition system that synthesizes a locomotion controller that fulfills state reachability constraints. This controller is further executed via a low-level motion planner that generates feasible locomotion trajectories. We construct a set of dynamic locomotion models for legged robots to serve as a template library for handling diverse environmental events. We devise a replanning strategy that takes into consideration sudden environmental changes or large state disturbances to increase the robustness of the resulting locomotion behaviors. We formally more » prove the correctness of the layered locomotion framework guaranteeing a robust implementation by the motion planning layer. Simulations of reactive locomotion behaviors in diverse environments indicate that our framework has the potential to serve as a theoretical foundation for intelligent locomotion behaviors.

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Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Award ID(s):
1924978
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10370538
Journal Name:
The International Journal of Robotics Research
Volume:
41
Issue:
8
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 812-847
ISSN:
0278-3649
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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