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Title: Informed Sampling-Based Planning to Enable Legged Robots to Safely Negotiate Permeable Obstacles
Abstract Legged robots have a unique capability of traversing rough terrains and negotiating cluttered environments. Recent control development of legged robots has enabled robust locomotion on rough terrains. However, such approaches mainly focus on maintaining balance for the robot body. In this work, we are interested in leveraging the whole body of the robot to pass through a permeable obstacle (e.g., a small confined opening) with height, width, and terrain constraints. This paper presents a planning framework for legged robots manipulating their body and legs to perform collision-free locomotion through a permeable obstacle. The planner incorporates quadrupedal gait constraint, biasing scheme, and safety margin for the simultaneous body and foothold motion planning. We perform informed sampling for the body poses and swing foot position based on the gait constraint while ensuring stability and collision avoidance. The footholds are planned based on the terrain and the contact constraint. We also integrate the planner with robot control to execute the planned trajectory successfully. We validated our approach in high-fidelity simulation and hardware experiments on the Unitree A1 robot navigating through different representative permeable obstacles.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2133091
NSF-PAR ID:
10441154
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics
Volume:
15
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1942-4302
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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