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Title: Progress on the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter adaptive secondary mirror
We report on progress at the University of Hawaii on the integration and testing setups for the adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) for the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. We report on the development of the handling fixtures and alignment tools we will use along with progress on the optical metrology tools we will use for the lab and on-sky testing of the system.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1910552
NSF-PAR ID:
10373995
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more » ; ; ; « less
Editor(s):
Schmidt, Dirk; Schreiber, Laura; Vernet, Elise
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proc. SPIE 12185, Adaptive Optics Systems VIII
Volume:
12185
Page Range / eLocation ID:
296
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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