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Title: Decentralized Control of Distributed Cloud Networks with Generalized Network Flows
Emerging distributed cloud architectures, e.g., fog and mobile edge computing, are playing an increasingly impor-tant role in the efficient delivery of real-time stream-processing applications (also referred to as augmented information services), such as industrial automation and metaverse experiences (e.g., extended reality, immersive gaming). While such applications require processed streams to be shared and simultaneously consumed by multiple users/devices, existing technologies lack efficient mechanisms to deal with their inherent multicast na-ture, leading to unnecessary traffic redundancy and network congestion. In this paper, we establish a unified framework for distributed cloud network control with generalized (mixed-cast) traffic flows that allows optimizing the distributed execution of the required packet processing, forwarding, and replication operations. We first characterize the enlarged multicast network stability region under the new control framework (with respect to its unicast counterpart). We then design a novel queuing system that allows scheduling data packets according to their current destination sets, and leverage Lyapunov drift-plus-penalty con-trol theory to develop the first fully decentralized, throughput-and cost-optimal algorithm for multicast flow control. Numerical experiments validate analytical results and demonstrate the performance gain of the proposed design over existing network control policies.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1816699 2148315
NSF-PAR ID:
10383149
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Communications
ISSN:
0090-6778
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 1
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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