skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 11:00 PM ET on Thursday, June 13 until 2:00 AM ET on Friday, June 14 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: Toward Understanding Children’s Use and Understanding of User Authentication Systems: Work-in-Progress
Children’s use of computing devices has increased over the past 15 years, requiring age-appropriate user authentication systems. This paper details a research study which investigates continuous authentication systems that do not require user-initiated interactions as an accessible authentication model for not only children users, but users across different age groups, with specific application on personal computing devices.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2039373
NSF-PAR ID:
10394636
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
USENIX Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Mobile devices typically rely on entry-point and other one-time authentication mechanisms such as a password, PIN, fingerprint, iris, or face. But these authentication types are prone to a wide attack vector and worse 1 INTRODUCTION Currently smartphones are predominantly protected a patterned password is prone to smudge attacks, and fingerprint scanning is prone to spoof attacks. Other forms of attacks include video capture and shoulder surfing. Given the increasingly important roles smartphones play in e-commerce and other operations where security is crucial, there lies a strong need of continuous authentication mechanisms to complement and enhance one-time authentication such that even if the authentication at the point of login gets compromised, the device is still unobtrusively protected by additional security measures in a continuous fashion. The research community has investigated several continuous authentication mechanisms based on unique human behavioral traits, including typing, swiping, and gait. To this end, we focus on investigating physiological traits. While interacting with hand-held devices, individuals strive to achieve stability and precision. This is because a certain degree of stability is required in order to manipulate and interact successfully with smartphones, while precision is needed for tasks such as touching or tapping a small target on the touch screen (Sitov´a et al., 2015). As a result, to achieve stability and precision, individuals tend to develop their own postural preferences, such as holding a phone with one or both hands, supporting hands on the sides of upper torso and interacting, keeping the phone on the table and typing with the preferred finger, setting the phone on knees while sitting crosslegged and typing, supporting both elbows on chair handles and typing. On the other hand, physiological traits, such as hand-size, grip strength, muscles, age, 424 Ray, A., Hou, D., Schuckers, S. and Barbir, A. Continuous Authentication based on Hand Micro-movement during Smartphone Form Filling by Seated Human Subjects. DOI: 10.5220/0010225804240431 In Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Information Systems Security and Privacy (ICISSP 2021), pages 424-431 ISBN: 978-989-758-491-6 Copyrightc 2021 by SCITEPRESS – Science and Technology Publications, Lda. All rights reserved still, once compromised, fail to protect the user’s account and data. In contrast, continuous authentication, based on traits of human behavior, can offer additional security measures in the device to authenticate against unauthorized users, even after the entry-point and one-time authentication has been compromised. To this end, we have collected a new data-set of multiple behavioral biometric modalities (49 users) when a user fills out an account recovery form in sitting using an Android app. These include motion events (acceleration and angular velocity), touch and swipe events, keystrokes, and pattern tracing. In this paper, we focus on authentication based on motion events by evaluating a set of score level fusion techniques to authenticate users based on the acceleration and angular velocity data. The best EERs of 2.4% and 6.9% for intra- and inter-session respectively, are achieved by fusing acceleration and angular velocity using Nandakumar et al.’s likelihood ratio (LR) based score fusion. 
    more » « less
  2. Password-based mobile user authentication is vulnerable to a variety of security threats. Shoulder-surfing is the key to those security threats. Despite a large body of research on password security with mobile devices, existing studies have focused on shaping the security behavior of mobile users by enhancing the strengths of user passwords or by establishing secure password composition policies. There is little understanding of how an attacker actually goes about observing the password of a target user. This study empirically examines attackers’ behaviors in observing passwordbased mobile user authentication sessions across the three observation attempts. It collects data through a longitudinal user study and analyzes the data collected through a system log. The results reveal several behavioral patterns of attackers. The findings suggest that attackers are strategic in deploying attacks of shoulder-surfing. The findings have implications for enhancing users’ password security and refining organizations’ password composition policies. 
    more » « less
  3. Computing is transitioning from single-user devices to the Internet of Things (IoT), in which multiple users with complex social relationships interact with a single device. Currently deployed techniques fail to provide usable access-control specification or authentication in such settings. In this paper, we begin reenvisioning access control and authentication for the home IoT. We propose that access control focus on IoT capabilities (i. e., certain actions that devices can perform), rather than on a per-device granularity. In a 425-participant online user study, we find stark differences in participants’ desired access-control policies for different capabilities within a single device, as well as based on who is trying to use that capability. From these desired policies, we identify likely candidates for default policies. We also pinpoint necessary primitives for specifying more complex, yet desired, access-control policies. These primitives range from the time of day to the current location of users. Finally, we discuss the degree to which different authentication methods potentially support desired policies. 
    more » « less
  4. Continuous location authentication (CLA) seeks to continuously and automatically verify the physical presence of legitimate users in a protected indoor area. CLA can play an important role in contexts where access to electrical or physical resources must be limited to physically present legitimate users. In this paper, we present WearRF-CLA, a novel CLA scheme built upon increasingly popular wrist wearables and UHF RFID systems. WearRF-CLA explores the observation that human daily routines in a protected indoor area comprise a sequence of human-states (e.g., walking and sitting) that follow predictable state transitions. Each legitimate WearRF-CLA user registers his/her RFID tag and also wrist wearable during system enrollment. After the user enters a protected area, WearRF-CLA continuously collects and processes the gyroscope data of the wrist wearable and the phase data of the RFID tag signals to verify three factors to determine the user's physical presence/absence without explicit user involvement: (1) the tag ID as in a traditional RFID authentication system, (2) the validity of the human-state chain, and (3) the continuous coexistence of the paired wrist wearable and RFID tag with the user. The user passes CLA if and only if all three factors can be validated. Extensive user experiments on commodity smartwatches and UHF RFID devices confirm the very high security and low authentication latency of WearRF-CLA. 
    more » « less
  5. One-time login process in conventional authentication systems does not guarantee that the identified user is the actual user throughout the session. However, it is necessary to re-verify the user identity periodically throughout a login session, which is lacking in existing one-time login systems. In this paper, we introduce a usable and reliable Wearable-Assisted Continuous Authentication (WACA), which relies on the sensor-based keystroke dynamics and the authentication data is acquired through the built-in sensors of a wearable (e.g., smartwatch) while the user is typing. The acquired data is periodically and transparently compared with the registered profile of the initially logged-in user with one-way classifiers. With this, WACA continuously ensures that the current user is the user who logged-in initially. We implemented the WACA framework and evaluated its performance on real devices with real users. The empirical evaluation of WACA reveals that WACA is feasible and its error rate is as low as 1% with 30 seconds of processing time and 2 -3% for 20 seconds. The computational overhead is minimal. Furthermore, WACA is capable of identifying insider threats with very high accuracy (99.2%). 
    more » « less